Short Film Profile
SHARE
Is this your film? Log in to edit profile.

Naked Lady

A young Turkish woman Elif, lives with her parents in the Western suburbs of Sydney. She has been engaged to an Australian man for some time, having fought to convince her parents to accept this choice. Despite her independence of mind and spirit, her family’s cultural expectations dictate that she cannot leave home until after she is married. It is an environment where men are expected to make decisions for woman, first the father, then the husband. But now, as she lives a modern working life, Elif has doubts about her fiancé. She doubts his honesty and fidelity, yet her family and relatives expect them to be married, and her father is angry and humiliated that this is taking so long. Elif finds space and solace in the garden. She treasures her lilies as friends, and tends them as soon as she wakes. Her mother and grandmother have also tended the lilies, especially the dramatic and resilient Naked Lady lily. Elif must make a choice. Will she gain support and strength through this private love?

Film notes

In the world I have grown up, women's lives are often controlled by men - first by fathers or brothers, then by husbands. In this world women are not free to make decisions about their lives, but must serve the strict rules of a society bound by custom, tradition and cultural expectations. The rules serve this society and if they move outside the rules, they can suffer harsh judgments.

As the writer and director of Naked Lady, who has grown up with this but now lives in Sydney, I have tried to express the story for these women. Even though they live in a modern Australian society, they still have to face barriers on these rules. That is why I wanted to tell their story in my short film. Firstly, I think this is a responsibility to myself and then to these women.

Elif’s story in Naked Lady is the silent voice (common voice) of women who are after the independence to shape their own lives.

Filmmakers

Copyright

Copyright © 2011 Cennet Serce

Film details

Dialogue languages

Subtitle languages

Picture

Aspect ratio

Classification

G (Australia)

Additional details, including film categories, dialogue/subtitle languages and technical details are available to members.

Log in or register

Information on this profile is provided by the film owners and/or compiled from available sources | Profile updated 23 Oct 2011